Troyan, A Legendary Actuarial Consulting Firm, For Pension Evaluations.

Court Admissible Reports Per Your Jurisdiction at an affordable cost.

We specialize in retirement plan analysis for divorce & economic loss matters

court admitted pension experts, available to testify nationwide.

Pension evaluations prepared for lawyers, mediators, & non-attorney litigants.

We guarantee your qdro gets approved!

headquarters of troyan, inc. Home of accucalc & accuqdro software

Pension Evaluation Lawyer Services Downloads Fee Schedule Pay Online Online Order Form
Pension Evaluation
Basic Pension Principles
Cases
Community Property
Dividing Marital or Community Property
Divorce & Retirement FAQs
Equitable Distribution
Experience with Your Plan
Pension Evaluation Issues
Pensions
Retirement Terms
Social Security Offsets
State Pension Evaluation Alerts
State Pension Evaluation Classification
State Specific Information
State Retirement Plans and Divorce Information
State Listing of Statuses Disallowing Personal Identities In QDROs
State Analysis of IRA Exemptions
Collection Laws and Exemptions by State
Tax Treatment in Pension Evaluation
Distribution from Qualified Plans
Webutation
Click here to learn more about pension evaluations
Get a pension evaluation in less than 1 week Click here to read and print our company forms

New Hampshire

JURISDICTIONAL END OF MARRIAGE DATE: Date of Petition of Divorce. If there is no Petition Date use current date.

STATE TYPE FOR PENSION EVALUATION: New Hampshire is an "equitable distribution" state. Upon granting a divorce, the court will divide all property of both parties, both real and personal, as it deems equitable between the parties. A presumption exists that an equal distribution is equitable. Some of the factors the court will consider in deciding how to equitably divide the property between the parties include:

1. The age, health, social or economic status, occupation, vocational skills, employability, separate property, amount and sources of income, and needs and liabilities of the parties;

2. The opportunity of each party for future acquisition of capital assets and income;

3. The ability of the custodial parent to engage in gainful employment without substantially interfering with the interests of any minor children;

4. The need of the custodial parent to occupy or own the marital home and to use or own its furnishings;

5. The actions of either party during the marriage which contributed to the growth in value of property owned by either or both parties;

6. Significant disparity between the parties in relation to contributions to the marriage;

7. Any direct or indirect contribution of one party to help educate or develop the career of the other and any interruption of either party's educational or career opportunities;

8. The expectation of either party to pension or retirement rights;

9. The tax consequences for each party;

10. The fault of either party to the marital breakdown;

11. Any other relevant factor.

[New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated; Chapter 458:16-a].


N.H. REV. STAT. ANN. § 458:16-a

Property Settlement.

I. Property shall include all tangible and intangible property and assets, real or personal, belonging to either or both parties, whether title to the property is held in the name of either or both parties. Intangible property includes, but is not limited to, employment benefits, vested and non-vested pension or other retirement benefits, or savings plans. To the extent permitted by federal law, property shall include military retirement and veterans' disability benefits.

II. When a dissolution of a marriage is decreed, the court may order an equitable division of property between the parties. The court shall presume that an equal division is an equitable distribution of property, unless the court establishes a trust fund under RSA 458:20 or unless the court decides that an equal division would not be appropriate or equitable after considering one or more of the following factors:

(a) The duration of the marriage.

(b) The age, health, social or economic status, occupation, vocational skills, employability, separate property, amount and sources of income, needs and liabilities of each party.

(c) The opportunity of each party for future acquisition of capital assets and income.

(d) The ability of the custodial parent, if any, to engage in gainful employment without substantially interfering with the interests of any minor children in the custody of said party.

(e) The need of the custodial parent, if any, to occupy or own the marital residence and to use or own its household effects.

(f) The actions of either party during the marriage which contributed to the growth or diminution in value of property owned by either or both of the parties.

(g) Significant disparity between the parties in relation to contributions to the marriage, including contributions to the care and education of the children and the care and management of the home.

(h) Any direct or indirect contribution made by one party to help educate or develop the career or employability of the other party and any interruption of either party's educational or personal career opportunities for the benefit of the other's career or for the benefit of the parties' marriage or children.

(i) The expectation of pension or retirement rights acquired prior to or during the marriage.

(j) The tax consequences for each party.

(k) The value of property that is allocated by a valid prenuptial contract made in good faith by the parties.

(l) The fault of either party as specified in RSA 458:7 if said fault caused the breakdown of the marriage and:

(1) Caused substantial physical or mental pain and suffering; or

(2) Resulted in substantial economic loss to the marital estate or the injured party.

(m) The value of any property acquired prior to the marriage and property acquired in exchange for property acquired prior to the marriage.

(n) The value of any property acquired by gift, devise, or descent.

(o) Any other factor that the court deems relevant.

III. The court shall specify written reasons for the division of property which it orders.

> Back to top

Visitor Security About Us Resources Contact Us
The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.